Upside-Down House in Taipei Draws Limelight

Upside-Down House in Taipei Draws Limelight

What you need to know

The Upside Down House exhibition in Taipei features an upside-down house decorated in American country style and furnished with real-size tables and chairs stuck to the ceiling. Since its debut, the house has attracted thousands of visitors and drawn international attention.

Translated and compiled by Bing-sheng Lee

Earlier this month, a three-story exhibition house, which is entirely upside down, opened its doors to the public at Huashan Creative Park in Taipei. The house has attracted thousands of visitors and drawn international attention.

Organized by Media Sphere Communications, an international artistic and cultural exhibition organizer based in Taiwan, the Upside Down House exhibition features an upside-down house decorated in American country style and furnished with real-size tables and chairs stuck to the ceiling.

The attraction, which has 3,500 square feet of floor space, also includes a bathroom, a kitchen, bedrooms and an upside-down garage with a full-sized vehicle screwed to the roof.

Photo Credit: UPSIDE DOWN HOUSE Facebook page

Photo Credit: UPSIDE DOWN HOUSE Facebook page

The house took over two months to complete and reportedly cost US$600 thousand to build. The designers paid close attention to details: the pasta on the dinner table hangs vertically as do the bathroom towels, and a computer in the study has yellow sticky notes attached to it.

Huang Cheng-Hsiang, an exhibition visitor, says he is excited to visit the house because the upside down perspective makes him feel like he is in a film like “The Exorcist” or “Spider-Man.”

The upside-down house in Taipei will remain open until July 22.

In addition to this exhibition, another upside-down house exhibition is also on display at the National Taiwan Science Education Center.

The exhibition, “Upside Down Wonderland,” is curated by Kuang Hong Arts and includes different themes of houses other than the upside-down house, such as a tree house, twisted house, mushroom house and candy house. This allows visitors to walk into an imaginative world with diverse visual experiences. The exhibition runs until February 29.

Upside-down houses in other countries

Taiwan is not the first place where an upside-down house has been built. The attractions have already been a popular form of art among artists around the world for years, and have been garnering more interest internationally.

First installed in Vancouver, Canada and later relocated to a park in Calgary, an upside-down church sculpture, “Device to Root Out Evil,” was created by American artist Dennis Oppenheim in 1997.

Talking about his design, Oppenheim once said, “Turning the church upside down makes it more aggressive, but not blasphemous.”

Photo Credit: Wendy Seltzer @Flickr CC BY 2.0

Photo Credit: Wendy Seltzer @Flickr CC BY 2.0

The 25-feet tall, aluminum framed, red glass shingled building, however, was uprooted in 2014 after the lease between the landowner and the owner of the church expired.

Turing to Austria, in 2012, an upside-down house was constructed in Terfens, a village west of the country. Designed and built by Polish architects Irek Glowacki and Marek Rozhanski, the house is meant to serve as a tourist attraction and is still open to the public.

Japan, Russia, Ukraine, Poland, Germany, Spain, the US and South Korea are also countries that have houses or restaurants built upside-down to attract tourists.

Edited by Olivia Yang

Sources:
UDN
Media Sphere Communications
“Three-storey upside down town house unveiled in Taipei” (The Telegraph)
“Upside-down house defies gravity, draws tourists in Taiwan” (United Press International)
“Visitors Flock to Upside-Down House in Taiwan” (Latin American Herald Tribune)
“PICTURED: Building this house was topsy-turvy experience” (Mail Online)
“Upside down house in Taiwan draws a crowd – video” (The Guardian)


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