Labor Groups Rallying to Urge Presidential Candidates to Regard Labor Policies

Labor Groups Rallying to Urge Presidential Candidates to Regard Labor Policies
Photo Credit:2016工人鬥總統
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The director of the labor alliance says that no matter who wins the presidential election, the workers will continue to supervise the government and keep fighting for labor rights.

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With the 2016 presidential election coming up on January 16, an alliance of several labor groups and industrial unions held a labor parade to advocate labor rights to the three presidential candidates.

The protesters, composed of several labor and student groups, appealed to the candidates to raise the labor pension fund’s benchmark rate to provide better care for retired workers; also to close the gap in wages between contract workers and formal employees and to establish laws regarding setting up labor unions.

Storm Media reports, as the protesters passed in front of the Legislative Yuan, they switched on more than 100 alarms and hurled them over the walls, saying that it was a wake-up call to ask the legislators to heed the labors’ voice.

The protesters later tossed about 150 smoke grenades towards the presidential office as a symbol that they face a cloudy future.

China Times reports, the police set up barbed wire barricades and warned the protesters their actions were illegal.

The director of the alliance says that no matter who wins the presidential election, the workers will continue to supervise the government and keep fighting for labor rights.

Lin Jia-wei, secretary-general of the Taoyuan Confederation of Trade Unions, takes People First Party presidential candidate James Soong (宋楚瑜) as an example and says that this is the third time Soong has taken part in the presidential election, but has never brought up any concrete labor policy.

KMT presidential candidate Eric Chu (朱立倫) says he will raise the minimum wage to NT$30,000 (approximately US$ 907.2) per month, but the KMT, as the ruling party, still let the Ministry of Labor press ahead with the current freeze of minimum wage.

Lin says, DPP presidential candidate Tsai Ing-wen (蔡英文) did meet with labor rights groups, but did not directly respond to the labor pension and seven-day statutory holiday issues.

Translated by June
Edited by Olivia Yang

Sources: