Universities in China Offering Doubled Salaries to Attract Taiwanese Professors

Universities in China Offering Doubled Salaries to Attract Taiwanese Professors
Photo Credit:CORBIS/達志影像

What you need to know

The emergence of universities in Taiwan and low fertility have led to many universities’ transition, merger and shutting down. The oversupply of teachers has compelled schools to reduce teachers’ salaries. This results in universities in China paying higher salaries to attract Taiwanese talented teachers.

The News Lens international edition is sponsored by Tutor A B C

The emergence of universities in Taiwan and low birth rate has led to many universities facing transition, merging and shutting down. The oversupply of teachers has compelled schools to reduce teachers’ salary. This results in universities in China paying higher salaries to attract Taiwanese talented teachers. The Ministry of Education says that they don’t prohibit Taiwanese teachers from teaching in China, but they need to make sure with the Mainland Affairs Council (MAC) what kind of institution can advertise in Taiwan.

UDN reports, according to statistics from the Ministry of Education, since 2010, there have been more than 30,000 doctoral graduates each year. In the case of oversupply, these professional talents have become the most important human resource for universities in China, especially for private universities.

There are nearly 50 Taiwanese teachers teaching at Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, which accounts for 10% of its faculty. On January 5, vice secretary of Fujian’s Education Committee, Yang Jiang-fan said that Fujian has made an effort to introduce Taiwanese university teachers, and is going to introduce about 200 full-time teachers this year.

SETN reports, Beijing Institute of Technology, Zhuhai advertised on Taiwanese newspaper for recruiting. They would like to introduce 100 Taiwanese teachers, offering them annual salaries of about NT$1.25 to NT$1.50 million (approximately US$37,792 to US$45,350) with subsidies for living, social insurances and flight tickets. One assistant professor says that teaching in China will double annual incomes.

CNA reports, Minister of Education We Se-hwa says that it is a good thing doctors who are educated in Taiwan can be recognized by world universities, which also means they admit Taiwan’s level of education.

Senior Executive Officer at the Ministry of Education’s Department of International and Cross-strait Education Liu Chih-min says, according to Article 3 in the Act Governing Relations Between the People of the Taiwan Area and the Mainland Area, Taiwanese people are not prohibited from teaching in China.

MAC says, the Act Governing Relations Between the People of the Taiwan Area and the Mainland Area allows advertising from China, but clearly states advertising items of educational institutions is not allowed. Whether educational advertising is included or not will be confirmed by the Ministry of Education. If it is regarded as illegal, newspapers that run advertisements from Chinese educational institutes will be fined up to NT$5 million (approximately US$15,117).

After one year working as a postdoctoral research fellow, Chung Tsuei-ping was invited to become an associate professor in 2012 at Jilin University, which ranks number eight in China. “I can’t say I don’t love my country, but it’s hard to stay in Taiwan,” she says. “Many doctoral graduates can’t even find a job after graduation.”

Dr. Wu, who does not wish to provide his full name, is going to teach at one of the Project 985 Universities, 39 top universities in China. He says that local Taiwanese doctors are great, but they would rather stay at Hsinchu Science and Industrial Park as engineers than take risks overseas when both Southeast Asia and China lack professors. But he adds if there are opportunities in the future, he still wants to return and contribute to Taiwan.

Translated by Wen-yee Lee
Edited by Olivia Yang

Sources:


Tags: