Taiwan Slaughter Industry Will Allow Foreign Workers in December

Taiwan Slaughter Industry Will Allow Foreign Workers in December
Photo Credit: Corbis/達志影像
What you need to know

The Ministry of Labor and the Council of Agriculture (COA) originally planned to bring in foreign workers for tea, fruits, mushrooms, orchids, slaughterhouses and livestock, but the meeting in June only agreed to allow foreign workers in slaughterhouses and other industries were rejected.

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To ease the domestic labor shortage problem of the agricultural and livestock industry, the Ministry of Labor says that applications for foreign workers to work in the slaughter industry will be available in the middle of December at the earliest. Moreover, the Ministry of Labor and the Council of Agriculture (COA) reached a consensus on allowing foreign workers in the livestock industry. The pilot program expects to be released by the end of December.

CNA reports, the Ministry of Labor held a group meeting for the Cross-Border Workforce Policy in October and agreed to open the slaughter industry for hiring foreign workers. According to the insurance standards for hiring foreign workers in the slaughter industry, the basic proportion of foreign employees is 25% and no higher than 40%. This is to ensure the domestic employment opportunities through different level employment security fees.

The Bureau of Animal and Plant Health Inspection and Quarantine in the Council of Agriculture explains that the ratio of foreign worker distribution is based on the existing manufacture of frozen meat. 25% of the people insured is the basis, and extra employment security fees of NT$ 3,000, NT$ 5,000 and NT$ 7,000 per month would be paid according to the increase of 5%, 10% and 15% respectively to ensure the rights of domestic workers.

The Bureau of Animal and Plant Health Inspection and Quarantine in the Council of Agriculture says that the survey finds that current staff shortage in 135 slaughterhouses is 1,588 people. Although they have recruited people through different channels in the past six months, only 195 people were hired and 165 people quit their jobs at the same time. Due to the long-term staff shortage in the slaughter industry, the increasing workload and long working hours also affect meat supply.

Apple Daily reports, employers who own licensed slaughterhouses can apply to hire foreign workers. It is estimated that about 600 foreign workers will be brought in.

In addition, the Ministry of Labor says the staff shortage in the livestock industry is very serious and the current staff is usually middle-aged workers or has family members in the same industry. The pilot program for bringing in foreign workers will start in December at the earliest, aiming at medium-sized livestock industries that raise 80 to 400 livestock.

UDN reports, the Ministry of Labor and the Council of Agriculture (COA) originally planned to bring in foreign workers for tea, fruits, mushrooms, orchids, slaughterhouses and livestock, but the meeting in June only agreed to allow foreign workers in slaughterhouses and other industries were rejected.

Translated by Wee-yee Lee
Edited by Olivia Yang

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