US Congress Supports Taiwan's Participation in Interpol

US Congress Supports Taiwan's Participation in Interpol
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This is the third time the US Congress has called on the administration department to obtain observer status for Taiwan in international organizations, including WHA (World Health Assembly) and ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization).

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The US House of Representatives passed a bill yesterday in support of Taiwan’s participation in the International Criminal Police Organization (Interpol) with a vote of 392-0.

This is the third time the US Congress has called on the administration department to obtain observer status for Taiwan in international organizations, including WHA (World Health Assembly) and ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization).

Before the bill (H.R. 1853) was referred to the full floor for a vote, it had already received bipartisan support and the endorsement of 114 representatives. According to US law, the legislation will now move the US Senate for screening and approval before it comes into effect.

China Times reports, the bill explains the significance of Taiwan’s participation in Interpol and directs several requirements to the administration department, including:

1. The US President should develop a strategy to obtain observer status for Taiwan in Interpol.
2. The US President should instruct Interpol Washington to officially request observer status for Taiwan in Interpol.
3. The US President should actively urge Interpol member states to support such observer status and participation for Taiwan.
4. The US President should propose a non-confidential report to the Congress and explain the strategy and physical action the US can take 30 days after the bill comes into effect.

The Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office in the US has shown gratitude for the US Congress’s support in a press release.

Liberty Times reports, Taiwan was a full member of Interpol under the identity of the National Police Agency from 1964 until 1984, when China applied for membership.

Focus Taiwan reports, this has prevented Taiwan from gaining access to Interpol’s I-24/7 global police communications system that provides real-time information on criminals and global criminal activities, leaving Taiwan dependent on secondhand information from other countries.

The US declared its intention to support Taiwan’s participation in appropriate international organizations in its 1994 Taiwan Policy Review, and has consistently reiterated that support.

Translated and compiled by June
Edited by Olivia Yang

Sources: