3D Model Yearbooks for Visually Impaired Students

3D Model Yearbooks for Visually Impaired Students

What you need to know

The Ctrl+P team visits Taichung every week or two free of charge and creates teaching materials, charts and even tools like protractors to help the students understand the classes intuitively.

How can a yearbook for the visually impaired be created? Students from Hueiming School for the visually impaired in Taiching received a very special graduation present this year: a set of 3D models.

The models are a graduation present made especially for the students by the Ctrl+P team. The team’s initial purpose was to spark creativity and ideas in children through encouraging innovative technology education.

Ctrl+P collaborated with Hueiming this year and helped the visually impaired students understand the classes better with 3D models. The team is currently stationed in the Makerspace, FutureWard.

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The yearbook created by the Ctrl+P team. Photo Credit:Yuan

Dong Xiao-mei, communications manager of Futureward says, “The yearbook is only one of Ctrl+P’s accomplishments. Their long-term project is to introduce 3D printing techniques to the school and design teaching materials, for example letting the students learn from touching geometric shapes and models of terrains. This project just recently earned recognition from the Keep Walking Fund.”

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A 3D world map designed by Ctrl+P. Photo provided by Ctrl+P

Chen Li-chao, manager of Ctrl+P, says, “We started out teaching children how to 3D print. My wife volunteers at the art museum in Taichung, and the museum has a program that is designed for visually impaired students. This is how we made contact with Hueiming. We randomly started talking about using 3D models to teach math and geography, and the discussion has gone on for almost a year.”

The Ctrl+P team visits Taichung every week or two free of charge and creates teaching materials, charts and even tools like protractors to help the students understand the classes intuitively.

Li-chao says, “We discuss with the teachers what their expectations for the teaching materials are. One of the teachers is also visually impaired and has provided us with a lot of valuable advice. Though Hueiming is a private institution, the tuition is free and it has fewer resources than public schools. We will be working with the National Taichung Special Education School for the Visually Impaired in the future and we encourage more teachers to join us. We have also launched a website because of the funding from the Keep Walking Fund, and we hope more designers can join us. Each country uses a different Braille system, but teaching materials like maps and tools are universal. We hope to popularize this concept to the entire world through creating an open database of 3D models that anyone can download from.”

*Special thanks goes to FutureWard and the Ctrl+P team.

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Visually impaired students touching figures made from 3D printers. Photo provided by Ctrl+P

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Preparing to create the figures for the students. Photo provided by Ctrl+P

Translated by Olivia Yang

Sources:
Liberty Times
China Times
Ctrl+P Facebook Page
Radio Taiwan International (RTI)


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